Origin of propionibacterium in surgical wounds and evidence-based approach for culturing propionibacterium from surgical sites

Frederick A. Matsen, Susan Butler-Wu, Bradley C. Carofino, Jocelyn Jette, Alexander Bertelsen, Roger Bumgarner

  • 25 Citations

Abstract

Background: To explore the origin of Propionibacterium in surgical wounds and to suggest an optimized strategy for culturing this organism at the time of revision surgery we studied the presence of this organism on the skin and in the surgical wounds of patients who underwent revision arthroplasty for reasons other than apparent infection. Methods: Specimens were cultured in broth and on aerobic and anaerobic media. The presence and degree of positivity of Propionibacterium cultures were correlated with sex. The results of dermal and deep cultures were correlated. Times to positivity and the yields of each media type and specimen source were investigated. Results: Propionibacterium grew in twenty-three of thirty cultures of specimens obtained preoperatively from the unprepared epidermis over the area where a skin incision was going to be made for a shoulder arthroplasty; males had a greater average degree of positivity than females (p 0.002). Twelve of twenty-one male subjects and zero of twenty female subjects who had cultures of dermal specimens obtained during revision shoulder arthroplasty had positive findings for Propionibacterium (p = 0.0001). Twelve of twenty male subjects and only one of twenty female subjects had positive deep cultures (p = 0.0004). The positivity of dermal cultures for Propionibacterium was significantly associated with the positivity of deep cultures for this organism (p = 0.0001). If Propionibacterium was present in deep tissues it was likely that it would be recovered by culture if four different specimens were obtained and cultured for a minimum of seventeen days on three different media: aerobic anaerobic and broth. Conclusions: Because the surgical incision of dermal sebaceous glands may be a source of Propionibacterium in deep wounds strategies for minimizing the risk of Propionibacterium infections may need to be directed at minimizing the contamination of surgical wounds from these bacteria residing in rather than on the skin. Obtaining at least four specimens observing them for seventeen days and using three types of culture media optimize the recovery of Propionibacterium at the time of revision surgery. COPYRIGHT © 2013 BY THE JOURNAL OF BONE AND JOINT SURGERY.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Bone and Joint Surgery - Series A
Volume95
Issue number23
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 4 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Propionibacterium
Wounds and Injuries
Skin
Arthroplasty
Infection
Sebaceous Glands
Epidermis
Culture Media
Bacteria
Bone and Bones

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

@article{ce48e2e1e6a049588c2d80ac98515f6b,
title = "Origin of propionibacterium in surgical wounds and evidence-based approach for culturing propionibacterium from surgical sites",
author = "Matsen, {Frederick A.} and Susan Butler-Wu and Carofino, {Bradley C.} and Jocelyn Jette and Alexander Bertelsen and Roger Bumgarner",
year = "2013",
month = "12",
doi = "10.2106/JBJS.L.01733",
volume = "95",
journal = "Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery - Series A",
issn = "0021-9355",
publisher = "Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery Inc.",
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T1 - Origin of propionibacterium in surgical wounds and evidence-based approach for culturing propionibacterium from surgical sites

AU - Matsen,Frederick A.

AU - Butler-Wu,Susan

AU - Carofino,Bradley C.

AU - Jette,Jocelyn

AU - Bertelsen,Alexander

AU - Bumgarner,Roger

PY - 2013/12/4

Y1 - 2013/12/4

N2 - Background: To explore the origin of Propionibacterium in surgical wounds and to suggest an optimized strategy for culturing this organism at the time of revision surgery we studied the presence of this organism on the skin and in the surgical wounds of patients who underwent revision arthroplasty for reasons other than apparent infection. Methods: Specimens were cultured in broth and on aerobic and anaerobic media. The presence and degree of positivity of Propionibacterium cultures were correlated with sex. The results of dermal and deep cultures were correlated. Times to positivity and the yields of each media type and specimen source were investigated. Results: Propionibacterium grew in twenty-three of thirty cultures of specimens obtained preoperatively from the unprepared epidermis over the area where a skin incision was going to be made for a shoulder arthroplasty; males had a greater average degree of positivity than females (p 0.002). Twelve of twenty-one male subjects and zero of twenty female subjects who had cultures of dermal specimens obtained during revision shoulder arthroplasty had positive findings for Propionibacterium (p = 0.0001). Twelve of twenty male subjects and only one of twenty female subjects had positive deep cultures (p = 0.0004). The positivity of dermal cultures for Propionibacterium was significantly associated with the positivity of deep cultures for this organism (p = 0.0001). If Propionibacterium was present in deep tissues it was likely that it would be recovered by culture if four different specimens were obtained and cultured for a minimum of seventeen days on three different media: aerobic anaerobic and broth. Conclusions: Because the surgical incision of dermal sebaceous glands may be a source of Propionibacterium in deep wounds strategies for minimizing the risk of Propionibacterium infections may need to be directed at minimizing the contamination of surgical wounds from these bacteria residing in rather than on the skin. Obtaining at least four specimens observing them for seventeen days and using three types of culture media optimize the recovery of Propionibacterium at the time of revision surgery. COPYRIGHT © 2013 BY THE JOURNAL OF BONE AND JOINT SURGERY.

AB - Background: To explore the origin of Propionibacterium in surgical wounds and to suggest an optimized strategy for culturing this organism at the time of revision surgery we studied the presence of this organism on the skin and in the surgical wounds of patients who underwent revision arthroplasty for reasons other than apparent infection. Methods: Specimens were cultured in broth and on aerobic and anaerobic media. The presence and degree of positivity of Propionibacterium cultures were correlated with sex. The results of dermal and deep cultures were correlated. Times to positivity and the yields of each media type and specimen source were investigated. Results: Propionibacterium grew in twenty-three of thirty cultures of specimens obtained preoperatively from the unprepared epidermis over the area where a skin incision was going to be made for a shoulder arthroplasty; males had a greater average degree of positivity than females (p 0.002). Twelve of twenty-one male subjects and zero of twenty female subjects who had cultures of dermal specimens obtained during revision shoulder arthroplasty had positive findings for Propionibacterium (p = 0.0001). Twelve of twenty male subjects and only one of twenty female subjects had positive deep cultures (p = 0.0004). The positivity of dermal cultures for Propionibacterium was significantly associated with the positivity of deep cultures for this organism (p = 0.0001). If Propionibacterium was present in deep tissues it was likely that it would be recovered by culture if four different specimens were obtained and cultured for a minimum of seventeen days on three different media: aerobic anaerobic and broth. Conclusions: Because the surgical incision of dermal sebaceous glands may be a source of Propionibacterium in deep wounds strategies for minimizing the risk of Propionibacterium infections may need to be directed at minimizing the contamination of surgical wounds from these bacteria residing in rather than on the skin. Obtaining at least four specimens observing them for seventeen days and using three types of culture media optimize the recovery of Propionibacterium at the time of revision surgery. COPYRIGHT © 2013 BY THE JOURNAL OF BONE AND JOINT SURGERY.

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