Understanding and Using the Implicit Association Test: III. Meta-Analysis of Predictive Validity

Anthony G. Greenwald, T. Andrew Poehlman, Eric Luis Uhlmann, Mahzarin R. Banaji

  • 789 Citations

Abstract

This review of 122 research reports (184 independent samples, 14,900 subjects) found average r = .274 for prediction of behavioral, judgment, and physiological measures by Implicit Association Test (IAT) measures. Parallel explicit (i.e., self-report) measures, available in 156 of these samples (13,068 subjects), also predicted effectively (average r = .361), but with much greater variability of effect size. Predictive validity of self-report was impaired for socially sensitive topics, for which impression management may distort self-report responses. For 32 samples with criterion measures involving Black-White interracial behavior, predictive validity of IAT measures significantly exceeded that of self-report measures. Both IAT and self-report measures displayed incremental validity, with each measure predicting criterion variance beyond that predicted by the other. The more highly IAT and self-report measures were intercorrelated, the greater was the predictive validity of each. © 2009 American Psychological Association.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)17-41
Number of pages25
JournalJournal of Personality and Social Psychology
Volume97
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Keywords

  • attitude-behavior relations
  • Implicit Association Test
  • implicit attitudes
  • implicit measures
  • validity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Social Psychology

Cite this

Understanding and Using the Implicit Association Test : III. Meta-Analysis of Predictive Validity. / Greenwald, Anthony G.; Poehlman, T. Andrew; Uhlmann, Eric Luis; Banaji, Mahzarin R.

In: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Vol. 97, No. 1, 07.2009, p. 17-41.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Greenwald, Anthony G.; Poehlman, T. Andrew; Uhlmann, Eric Luis; Banaji, Mahzarin R. / Understanding and Using the Implicit Association Test : III. Meta-Analysis of Predictive Validity.

In: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Vol. 97, No. 1, 07.2009, p. 17-41.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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